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Posts Tagged ‘manager’

Heyman: Macha Likely to Return

September 23, 2009 1 comment

According to SI.com’s Jon Heyman, Ken Macha is expected to return as manager of the Milwaukee Brewers next season, with one caveat — he likely won’t be getting an extension.

That would make Macha a lame duck manager in 2010, which would go against everything we’ve come to expect from GM Doug Melvin.  We’re talking about the guy who quietly gave Ned Yost a (largely undeserved) contract extension after the 2007 collapse just to avoid having Yost enter the 2008 season in the last year of his deal.

While Macha seems to be returning, Heyman’s source makes it seem like that won’t be the case for pitching coach Chris Bosio.  It makes sense that Bosio would be given an interview and a chance to keep the job in the offseason, but we’re being given the impression that he won’t be brought back.  Whether or not that’s fair is up to debate — as interim pitching coach, it’s certainly not Bosio’s fault that the team had little-to-no starting pitching depth, but he’s the easy target for “improvement.”

Considering how the team has struggled to get comfortable under Macha’s watch, it’s hard to feel good about this report.  The only comfort to be gained is that Macha should and probably will be on a very short leash on 2010. 

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Sometimes Different Doesn’t Equal Better

September 16, 2009 1 comment

When a team struggles, it’s a natural reaction to point to the manager as the root of the problem.  They’re simultaneously the most visible and most expendable part of the front office, and it’s become common to associate any success or failure with the manager’s decision making.  For the most part, that’s why firing your manager is step number one in proving to your fans that you’re trying to improve.

Sometimes, the change helps.  Buck Showalter was fired by both the New York Yankees and the Arizona Diamondbacks, and the next year, his old teams won the World Series.  More often than not, though, having a new face in the dugout doesn’t change anything.  Sometimes, it can even make matters worse.

I bring this up because the Brewers are in danger of becoming one of “those teams” — an organization that’s quick to fire its manager whenever things go south instead of working to actually fix the problem. 

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